Featured publication: Density functional theory-based electric field gradient database

 

QSEC members Dr. Igor Mazin, Dr. Karen Sauer and student Jaafar Ansari have recently published their collaborative work of DFT-based EFG calculation, Density functional theory-based electric field gradient database, doi:10.1038/s41597-020-00707-8, on Scientific Data.

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Science Off Camera Podcast with Prof. Patrick Vora

 

Prof. Patrick Vora, Director of the QSEC, was recently invited by the Science Off Camera Podcast for an interview on quantum materials, their development and methods of characterization, and the role of QSEC in this research area.  The podcast is available here.

The Science Off Camera Podcast is sponsored by Teledyne Princeton Instruments and Teledyne Photometrics and hosted by Dr. Matthew Kose-Dunn and Sebastian Remi, to discuss with scientists and industry leaders in scientific imaging and spectroscopy.

For more information, please explore our website to learn more about our efforts in quantum research and education.

[MQA Seminar] Quantum Basics for the Curious: A Fireside Chat with Nobel Laureate Dr. Bill Phillips

2 pm, September 22, 2020
Invited Speaker:
Dr. Bill Phillips, Nobel Laureate,University of Maryland
Laurie Locascio, VP for Research; University of Maryland

Topic: Quantum Basics for the Curious: A Fireside Chat with Nobel Laureate Dr. Bill Phillips

RSVP

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Relaunch of the Quantum Science and Engineering Center

 

Mason’s Quantum Material Center (QMC), one of the four Transdisciplinary Centers for Advanced Study supported by the Provost Office of Research, is now officially Quantum Science and Engineering Center (QSEC).

QSEC was established in February 2018 and has grown beyond its roots as a materials science organization to a community of Mason scientists and engineers interested in advancing quantum technology. Our members focus on creating quantum algorithms for quantum computing, constructing ultra-sensitive quantum sensors, designing and discovering quantum materials for new computing technologies, and building training programs to prepare Mason students for a technological workforce that will increasingly require a knowledge of quantum science and engineering.

QSEC will continue supporting the exploration of these high-risk high-reward ideas by fostering a collaborative, interdisciplinary, community-focused environment at Mason where some of the most challenging problems in quantum can be freely explored in new ways through convergent research. This provides a unique environment and access for graduate students, undergraduate students, and postdoctoral researchers to make transformative contributions to quantum technology. Seeking to accelerate the second quantum revolution by combining the efforts of physicists, mathematicians, computer scientists, and engineers, QSEC pursues these goals in collaboration with industrial partners, government organizations, and national consortia.

For more information, please explore our website to learn more about our efforts in quantum research and education.